Tag Archives: makeup

SMTown: Studio and dance class

20151020_110423

The studio on the fourth floor of SMTown at COEX Artium, guarded by Jonghyun. SCREAMfmLondon

SMTown Studio: Music Video, Photo, Recording, Hair & Makeup, Vocal, Dance, Dress

As you ascend to the top floors of SMTown at COEX Artium, the services become more deluxe. While you can purchase k-pop merchandise on the second floor, you can actually star in a k-pop music video on the third!

At the SMTown Studio, fans can be professionally styled with SM-approved costumes, hair and makeup; trained to create an audio recording of their favorite song; taught the corresponding dance moves; photographed and photoshopped to their hearts’ content; and filmed in a duplicate of their favorite music video. It honestly all looks like a ton of fun — especially if you have slight delusions of grandeur and a lot of money to blow.

The SMTown Studio packages range in price from about $30 (for a simple tour of the space and a commemorative photo) to $500 (for a two-hour video recording session). Most packages hover around the $100-200 range. A one-hour, one-on-one dance class costs about $100 (while a group class is around $80). A one-hour vocal training and recording session is $150, and it costs $200 (and, apparently, one and a half hours) to have your hair and makeup done.

I took a tour of the studio space that culminated in a one-hour dance class.

The tour begins at the makeup station, where marble tables are piled high with rows upon rows of blush, eye shadow, brushes and more. The walls are all covered with mirrors and “the best selfie lighting ever” (their words — not mine). I do not doubt, though, that SM Entertainment’s makeup artists could work some serious magic on us all with their superior beauty knowledge. It’s a tempting package, for sure.

20151020_111204

SMTown photo studio. SCREAMfmLondon

Behind the makeup station is the photo studio. It’s a pretty cavernous room decorated with yet-unreleased photos of SM artists for the guests to ogle. If you’re a fan of photoshoots, I’m sure this is a good one. I am not a fan of photoshoots, but they took a few photos of me anyway — and specified which way I should stand to make it easiest to photoshop.

20151020_111530

Some of TVXQ!’s costumes on display at SMTown. SCREAMfmLondon

My favorite stop on the tour is the wardrobe area. It’s a beautiful room full of costumes SM artists have worn onstage or at special events, all grouped by band and labeled with the individual members’ names. It was amazing to see these outfits up close and to examine all the details: every epaulette on SHINee’s jackets, every rhinestone on TVXQ!’s sleeves. Everything is so pristine, except for the scuff marks on the fabulous shoes. I loved it so much.

20151020_111619

The hard-working shoes of a k-pop star. SCREAMfmLondon

20151020_111645

SHINee’s outfits on display at SMTown. SCREAMfmLondon

20151020_111630

So much beautiful crushed velvet. SCREAMfmLondon

Next, we visited the vocal recording rooms. Allegedly, the rooms are really, really used by actual SM artists. This was emphasized many, many times during the tour. There are a number of different recording booths equipped with what is supposed to be the best, most advanced audio recording technology out there. I would not know the difference, so I’ll have to take their word for it.

From there, we journeyed through the hallways to the music video studio. The room is divided in two halves: EXO’s “Growl” on one side and Girls’ Generation’s “Gee” on the other.

20151020_113156

Music video set for EXO’s “Growl.” SCREAMfmLondon

This room was a little awkward for a few reasons. First, there were quite a few people sitting right in the middle of it doing some work on their computers while we’re just traipsing around, taking pictures of stuff.

Also, I happened to be there not long after Tao officially announced his departure from EXO and his subsequent lawsuit against SM Entertainment. It was a little too obvious that his name had been hastily painted over on a few of the walls while it still appeared on others. Awkward.

20151020_113313

Tao’s name hastily painted over at bottom right. SCREAMfmLondon

Once we departed from there, it was time for our dance lesson led by a professional SM choreographer. We stashed our belongings in fire engine red lockers that read “DREAMS COME TRUE” across the front and took our places to learn the dance for EXO’s song “Call Me Baby.”

The pace of the dance was very quick, but the instructor was patient and helpful. One hour was not enough time for any of us to master any of that, but we worked hard, and it was a blast. It seemed to go by very quickly, especially since a lot of time was taken when cameramen came in to record our practice and interview a few of us (including me, for some horrifying reason) about our interest in k-pop.

20151020_125834

Inside the SMTown dance studio. SCREAMfmLondon

It was a great class, though, and I was sad to leave. I could definitely imagine spending hours every day trying to perfect those dance moves, if I only could afford it.

The SMTown Studio experience was an interesting one. To be honest, the studio tour is a little boring and doesn’t offer much beyond selfie ops (and not very spectacular ones at that). I would recommend heading straight for your area of interest (singing, dancing, fashion) to maximize your enjoyment of the studio.

Check out my guide to SMTown’s SUM Celebrity Shop and LIVErary Café here.
Check out my guide to SMTown’s 3D printing theater here.

Advertisements

My picks: Best Korean BB creams

A section of my BB cream collection. SCREAMfmLondon

A section of my BB cream collection. SCREAMfmLondon

Since 2011, BB creams have been a presence in the beauty section of US stores. BB creams (aka. blemish balms, beauty balms, beblesh balms — whatever tickles your fancy) are one of my favorite cosmetic products for their all-in-one functionality. Ideal for anyone who wants to spend as little time as possible getting ready in the morning (that’s me!), BB creams serve as a primer, moisturizer, foundation and sunblock. I started loving them a few years ago, but the creams have been popular in Korea since the 1980s. Korean brands continue to innovate the balms, evolving into CC creams and cushion compacts (“air cushions”).

Here are my picks for the best Korean BB creams, foundations and more:

Banila Co. VV Bouncing Cushion

I am loving this Banila compact. It’s sleek and easy to carry with you throughout the day. It contains collagen intended to firm, lift and plump the skin, and it has an SPF of 50. And the cream has a great, light coverage. The packaging of this product is also really cool: you press down on the compact to dispense the cream onto the puff and then apply it to your face. It also comes with one full refill! I walked into Banila to buy a different cushion compact, but I’m very glad that I was persuaded to pick up this one.

20150720_213101

Skinfood Pore Fit Cushion Bottle. SCREAMfmLondon 

Skinfood Pore Fit Cushion Bottle

This is the weirdest beauty product I own. The Skinfood Pore Fit Cushion Bottle is a substantially-sized metal canister that you switch on and shake up as if you were going to use some spray paint. Then, you pump the lid a few times to dispense the product onto the cushion. Then, you open the lid and apply. I’ll be honest with you: it smells a lot like nail polish remover, and that doesn’t sound like a quality something would have if it was good to put on your face. But this cream makes the skin look so smooth and bright. It also has an SPF of 50, and it feels really cool going onto the face, which is refreshing for enlarged pores or skin that is affected by heat.

Mamonde Total Solution Moisture BB Cream

Mamonde serves as a good everyday BB cream when you haven’t got time for all the bells and whistles that go along with fancy spray paint bottle foundations. It has a lower SPF (just 35), but it provides very good coverage and really evens out the skin tone. Mamonde products, unfortunately, come in extremely light shades, but they blend into the skin quite well to effectively brighten and conceal redness. This BB cream provides more thorough coverage than some of the others, as it is a traditional pump bottle rather than a cushion compact. I really dig it on days I look and feel particularly tired.

20150720_213009

Skin79 VIP Gold Super BB Cream. SCREAMfmLondon

Skin79 VIP Gold Super BB Cream

This is the product I have been using for the longest. There are about 5 million variations on the Skin79 BB creams depending on your skin type — the VIP Gold is a bit richer for creamy application and full coverage. Like the Mamonde, the Skin79 BB creams come in a very specific shade of very light, but once this product oxidizes, it matches my skin color quite well. It is moisturizing and provides a kind of dewy finish. Also, I like the cool holographic bottle. I’ve been enjoying this BB cream for many months now, and I definitely think it’s worth a try.

Theater: Allison Volk, ‘Rite of Seymour’

Rite-of-Seymour-Doctor&Andersons_resized

Jeremy Kinser, Bilal Mir and Deborah Jensen star in ‘Rite of Seymour’ at the Son of Semele Theater. Photo courtesy of Drive Theatre Company.

It was a packed house during the closing weekend of Drive Theatre Company’s world premiere production of “Rite of Seymour” at the Son of Semele Theater.

So packed, in fact, that the start of the play was delayed as the crew scrambled to find enough chairs to accommodate the oversold audience, some of which were set up in the only aisle of the intimate space. (“If there’s an emergency… just push the chairs and run for it,” we were instructed.)

Though the space was limited, the production made impressive use of it with atmosphere-enhancing audio and visual elements. The costume design was impeccable, the makeup was very well done, and the sets were detailed and effective.

Playwright Allison Volk’s story follows Helena Gray (Mary Ellen Schneider), a 1950s housewife whose poet husband, Seymour (Robert Paterno), is slowly being “de-evolved” at the hands of a mad scientist/family practitioner (Bilal Mir). Unfortunately for Helena, she realizes this just as Seymour has entered the “homo chimextus” phase — the day before she planned a dinner party to pitch his poetry to a respected publisher.

Of course, that’s no reason to cancel a party. The event turns ultra-zany as Helena attempts to keep her husband’s transformation hidden, the doctor becomes increasingly insane, and the guests cannot keep from arguing amongst themselves.

The look of the play was truly excellent. Paterno skillfully acted as de-evolved Seymour, which, combined with his monkey makeover, was pretty disturbing. Yet convincing! The audience is initially horrified at his appearance but then grows to find him endearing, as do the characters in the play.

The set changes from the doctor’s waiting room to the Grays’ home and back again did take quite a while, but the cast made these changes in costume — often in character — which made them much more interesting. Jeremy Kinser as Mr. Anderson was especially good at this: he took advantage of all of his time onstage to keep the audience entertained and play up his character for extra laughs.

“Rite of Seymour” really excelled in its ensemble scenes. There was good chemistry among the actors, and they were able to effectively deliver jokes and play off one another in these big scenes. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson (Kinser and Deborah Jensen), in particular, gave standout performances and had the best comedic timing of the group.

More low-key scenes that featured only two characters, such as the introduction to Helena in the doctor’s office, dragged on a bit more. The doctor, who fancies himself an innovator similar to Igor Stravinsky, gave a few overly long monologues that emphasized Mir’s uncomfortable onstage demeanor and tendency to thrust his hands into his pockets while performing.

But the overall production of “Rite of Seymour” was a polished group effort. With some trimming of the script in a few key places, the play could be solidified as a more powerful force of comedy.