Tag Archives: light

Art Nouveau illuminated with Klimt Inside at S-Factory

Multicolored LED lights make up a maze-like room at the Klimt Inside exhibition at S-Factory in Seongsu-dong, Seoul. SCREAMfmLondon

Seongsu-dong is an artsy district in Seoul — home to a number of interesting cafés, shops and pop-up art installations. One such space is S-Factory, a newly-established gallery space in the middle of a cold, industrial Seongsu side street. The gallery has now hosted its share of buzz-worthy art shows, including Klimt Inside, a multimedia homage to Viennese painter Gustav Klimt that ran through April 19.

The “Later Colors” section of Klimt Inside shows off the artist’s more chromatic works. SCREAMfmLondon

More like a light show than a traditional art exhibition, Klimt Inside pairs the artist’s works with LED screens, neon bulbs and bits of musical accompaniment.

A neon message incorporated into the Klimt Inside exhibit. SCREAMfmLondon

The first S-Factory room is completely dark except for the images projected onto the carpet showing the different philosophers and artists who influenced Klimt’s early work.

Projections on the floor at Klimt Inside. SCREAMfmLondon

The most popular room at the Klimt Inside exhibit was also its most disappointing. A long line forms out front as visitors wait patiently for the chance to enter a multicolored cube made of windows and neon lights. From the outside, it looks spacious and surrealistic. The wait to take a look inside took so long that I expected some sort of maze to explore, but inside it was only hot and crowded with people doing impromptu 15-minute-long Instagram photoshoots. I don’t even know what this had to do with Klimt, but I had to squeeze myself out after a few minutes.

The famous LED light room at Klimt Inside. SCREAMfmLondon

My favorite room of the exhibition shows Klimt’s body-drawing sketches projected in black and white on large, blank canvases. The projections change at regular intervals, displaying various nudes and portraits.

Klimt’s portraits projected onto canvases. SCREAMfmLondon

The final room before you exit into the gift shop is Klimt’s most famous piece, “The Kiss.” The painting is displayed at the end of a long, narrow tunnel lit with two yellow neon lights. An electric current running through the lights in never-ending circles represents the eternal quality of love.

Gustav Klimt’s “The Kiss.” SCREAMfmLondon

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Spatial Illumination – 9 Lights in 9 Rooms at D Museum

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Flynn Talbot’s “Primary” installation is one of nine works of light-centered art on display at D Museum in Seoul. SCREAMfmLondon

The most popular art hotspot in Seoul right now is D Museum — a new exhibition space in Hannam-dong operated by Daelim Museum. The museum’s inaugural exhibition is “Spatial Illumination – 9 Lights in 9 Rooms,” which has been drawing crowds with large-scale light installations, sculptures, videos and interactive works by international artists.

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D Museum in Hannam-dong, Seoul. SCREAMfmLondon

The exhibit leads visitors through a maze-like space divided into nine rooms showcasing different pieces. The hallways (as well as many of the rooms) are darkened almost entirely as all of the artwork uses light as its medium.

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Flynn Talbot’s “Contour” depicts a human fingerprint, showing the light within yourself. SCREAMfmLondon

The journey begins with the neon installation of Cerith Wyn Evans, a British contemporary artist. “Neon forms (after Noh II and III)” are inspired by Japanese Noh theater.

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Cerith Wyn Evans’ “Neon forms (after Noh II and III)” at the D Museum in Seoul. SCREAMfmLondon

Next came one of my favorite rooms: Flynn Talbot’s color-changing piece, “Primary.” The light sources are concealed and the room is completely dark, which really gives you a chance to focus on the work and enjoy its strange, soothing qualities as the colored lights gradually shift from pink to blue to orange and everywhere in between.

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Flynn Talbot’s “Primary” at D Museum in Seoul. SCREAMfmLondon

Another favorite piece is Carlos Cruz-Diez’s “Chromosaturation.” Before entering the room, everyone is required to slip cloth covers over their shoes to protect the installation. The room is filled with different walls and shapes suspended from the ceiling. Different colored lights create interesting images when they catch all of the dimensions of the room.

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Carlos Cruz-Diez’s “Chromosaturation” at the D Museum in Seoul. SCREAMfmLondon

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One of the most popular rooms featured in D Museum’s current exhibition, “Spatial Illumination—9 Lights in 9 Rooms.” SCREAMfmLondon

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Such a fun room to explore. SCREAMfmLondon

After leaving the “Chromosaturation” room, visitors ascend the stairs. As you climb, Studio Roso’s “Mirror Branch” installation becomes visible. This piece is comprised of thousands of tiny mirrors forming the shape of a tree, which casts bright, twinkling reflections and bouncy shadows around the room and down the stairs.

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Studio Roso’s “Mirror Branch” at D Museum in Seoul. SCREAMfmLondon

Next, you open a door and are transported into a very cool room: “My Whale” created by a Russian creative group of sound engineers, musicians and visual artists. The tunnel is lined with mirrors, creating the illusion that it goes on infinitely. The room plays whale songs and its pulsing light projections change in time with the sounds.

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Tundra’s “My Whale” at D Museum in Seoul. SCREAMfmLondon

Paul Cocksedge filled one of the exhibition’s largest rooms with his piece, “Bourrasque,” which looks like sheets of lighted white paper blowing in the wind.

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Paul Cocksedge’s “Bourrasque” at D Museum in Seoul. SCREAMfmLondon

I particularly enjoyed Dutch artist Dennis Parren’s room. His “CMYK Corner” and “CMYK Wall” are specially-designed lights that project cyan, magenta and yellow on the surrounding walls. These pieces are simple but intriguing, hinting at the deconstruction of light.

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Dennis Parren’s “CMYK Wall” at D Museum in Seoul. SCREAMfmLondon

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I love this from every angle. SCREAMfmLondon

Parren also presented a CMYK installation called “Don’t Look Into the Light,” which uses its audience as the subject. The colorful shadows and shapes you create as you move through the space are really fun.

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Lots of selfies happen in here. SCREAMfmLondon

“Spatial Illumination – 9 Lights in 9 Rooms” is definitely a cool exhibition, and it’s totally worth checking out if you enjoy wandering around in the dark, appreciating neon and/or taking lots and lots of Instagram photos. I’m very curious to see what D Museum will present next.

Spatial Illumination – 9 Lights in 9 Rooms
D Museum
5-6, Dokseodang-ro, Yongsan-gu
Tickets are 8,000 KRW for adults, 5,000 KRW for students (ages 8-18), and 3,000 KRW for children (ages 3-7)
The exhibition runs through May 8.
For more information, visit www.daelimmuseum.org.