Category Archives: Visual Art

Art Nouveau illuminated with Klimt Inside at S-Factory

Multicolored LED lights make up a maze-like room at the Klimt Inside exhibition at S-Factory in Seongsu-dong, Seoul. SCREAMfmLondon

Seongsu-dong is an artsy district in Seoul — home to a number of interesting cafés, shops and pop-up art installations. One such space is S-Factory, a newly-established gallery space in the middle of a cold, industrial Seongsu side street. The gallery has now hosted its share of buzz-worthy art shows, including Klimt Inside, a multimedia homage to Viennese painter Gustav Klimt that ran through April 19.

The “Later Colors” section of Klimt Inside shows off the artist’s more chromatic works. SCREAMfmLondon

More like a light show than a traditional art exhibition, Klimt Inside pairs the artist’s works with LED screens, neon bulbs and bits of musical accompaniment.

A neon message incorporated into the Klimt Inside exhibit. SCREAMfmLondon

The first S-Factory room is completely dark except for the images projected onto the carpet showing the different philosophers and artists who influenced Klimt’s early work.

Projections on the floor at Klimt Inside. SCREAMfmLondon

The most popular room at the Klimt Inside exhibit was also its most disappointing. A long line forms out front as visitors wait patiently for the chance to enter a multicolored cube made of windows and neon lights. From the outside, it looks spacious and surrealistic. The wait to take a look inside took so long that I expected some sort of maze to explore, but inside it was only hot and crowded with people doing impromptu 15-minute-long Instagram photoshoots. I don’t even know what this had to do with Klimt, but I had to squeeze myself out after a few minutes.

The famous LED light room at Klimt Inside. SCREAMfmLondon

My favorite room of the exhibition shows Klimt’s body-drawing sketches projected in black and white on large, blank canvases. The projections change at regular intervals, displaying various nudes and portraits.

Klimt’s portraits projected onto canvases. SCREAMfmLondon

The final room before you exit into the gift shop is Klimt’s most famous piece, “The Kiss.” The painting is displayed at the end of a long, narrow tunnel lit with two yellow neon lights. An electric current running through the lights in never-ending circles represents the eternal quality of love.

Gustav Klimt’s “The Kiss.” SCREAMfmLondon

Spatial Illumination – 9 Lights in 9 Rooms at D Museum

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Flynn Talbot’s “Primary” installation is one of nine works of light-centered art on display at D Museum in Seoul. SCREAMfmLondon

The most popular art hotspot in Seoul right now is D Museum — a new exhibition space in Hannam-dong operated by Daelim Museum. The museum’s inaugural exhibition is “Spatial Illumination – 9 Lights in 9 Rooms,” which has been drawing crowds with large-scale light installations, sculptures, videos and interactive works by international artists.

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D Museum in Hannam-dong, Seoul. SCREAMfmLondon

The exhibit leads visitors through a maze-like space divided into nine rooms showcasing different pieces. The hallways (as well as many of the rooms) are darkened almost entirely as all of the artwork uses light as its medium.

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Flynn Talbot’s “Contour” depicts a human fingerprint, showing the light within yourself. SCREAMfmLondon

The journey begins with the neon installation of Cerith Wyn Evans, a British contemporary artist. “Neon forms (after Noh II and III)” are inspired by Japanese Noh theater.

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Cerith Wyn Evans’ “Neon forms (after Noh II and III)” at the D Museum in Seoul. SCREAMfmLondon

Next came one of my favorite rooms: Flynn Talbot’s color-changing piece, “Primary.” The light sources are concealed and the room is completely dark, which really gives you a chance to focus on the work and enjoy its strange, soothing qualities as the colored lights gradually shift from pink to blue to orange and everywhere in between.

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Flynn Talbot’s “Primary” at D Museum in Seoul. SCREAMfmLondon

Another favorite piece is Carlos Cruz-Diez’s “Chromosaturation.” Before entering the room, everyone is required to slip cloth covers over their shoes to protect the installation. The room is filled with different walls and shapes suspended from the ceiling. Different colored lights create interesting images when they catch all of the dimensions of the room.

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Carlos Cruz-Diez’s “Chromosaturation” at the D Museum in Seoul. SCREAMfmLondon

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One of the most popular rooms featured in D Museum’s current exhibition, “Spatial Illumination—9 Lights in 9 Rooms.” SCREAMfmLondon

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Such a fun room to explore. SCREAMfmLondon

After leaving the “Chromosaturation” room, visitors ascend the stairs. As you climb, Studio Roso’s “Mirror Branch” installation becomes visible. This piece is comprised of thousands of tiny mirrors forming the shape of a tree, which casts bright, twinkling reflections and bouncy shadows around the room and down the stairs.

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Studio Roso’s “Mirror Branch” at D Museum in Seoul. SCREAMfmLondon

Next, you open a door and are transported into a very cool room: “My Whale” created by a Russian creative group of sound engineers, musicians and visual artists. The tunnel is lined with mirrors, creating the illusion that it goes on infinitely. The room plays whale songs and its pulsing light projections change in time with the sounds.

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Tundra’s “My Whale” at D Museum in Seoul. SCREAMfmLondon

Paul Cocksedge filled one of the exhibition’s largest rooms with his piece, “Bourrasque,” which looks like sheets of lighted white paper blowing in the wind.

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Paul Cocksedge’s “Bourrasque” at D Museum in Seoul. SCREAMfmLondon

I particularly enjoyed Dutch artist Dennis Parren’s room. His “CMYK Corner” and “CMYK Wall” are specially-designed lights that project cyan, magenta and yellow on the surrounding walls. These pieces are simple but intriguing, hinting at the deconstruction of light.

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Dennis Parren’s “CMYK Wall” at D Museum in Seoul. SCREAMfmLondon

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I love this from every angle. SCREAMfmLondon

Parren also presented a CMYK installation called “Don’t Look Into the Light,” which uses its audience as the subject. The colorful shadows and shapes you create as you move through the space are really fun.

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Lots of selfies happen in here. SCREAMfmLondon

“Spatial Illumination – 9 Lights in 9 Rooms” is definitely a cool exhibition, and it’s totally worth checking out if you enjoy wandering around in the dark, appreciating neon and/or taking lots and lots of Instagram photos. I’m very curious to see what D Museum will present next.

Spatial Illumination – 9 Lights in 9 Rooms
D Museum
5-6, Dokseodang-ro, Yongsan-gu
Tickets are 8,000 KRW for adults, 5,000 KRW for students (ages 8-18), and 3,000 KRW for children (ages 3-7)
The exhibition runs through May 8.
For more information, visit www.daelimmuseum.org.

SMTown: Getting a 3D print with a k-pop star

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The future is now: my 3D print with Key from SHINee (featuring a photobomb from cardboard Infinite). SCREAMfmLondon

This is absolutely one of the coolest souvenirs imaginable. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: k-pop is truly on the next level. The k-pop fan’s experience is unparalleled. With hologram concerts of the biggest stars and 3D-printed statuettes of fans standing with their favorite idols, it does not get any better than this.

SMTown Theatre: 3D Printing

SMTown at COEX Artium’s sixth floor houses the 3D printing theater, where fans can buy tiny, keychain-sized likenesses of SM artists or go all out with a sizable print of themselves posing proudly beside their idol of choice.

The full-size, unique figurine with an SM artist costs 625,000 KRW (that’s about $550 USD). The price is pretty fair — most places that sell 3D prints will charge around $300 for one person. It’s definitely well worth the cost to have such an incredible memento of this moment in your life while you’re still young, cute and really into boybands.

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3D prints of the artists on SMTown at COEX Artium’s sixth floor. SCREAMfmLondon

First, you select your favorite k-pop star and the appropriate pose. I picked Key from SHINee — a controversial choice, apparently, as the staff gave me incredulous looks, repeating, “Key? Are you sure? …Key?” throughout the process.

But I think he was the perfect choice. Of all the SM artists, I feel like Key and I are an excellent match and could totally be friends. Like, we’d really get along well and could probably watch RuPaul’s Drag Race together. Beauty fades, but that kind of spiritual connection is forever.

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Best friends forever. SCREAMfmLondon

I wanted a pose where we were interacting somehow, but I couldn’t imagine us standing in a romantic embrace with his arms around me. Plus, they had to digitally alter him so he was tall enough (“I think you are… bigger than him,” a staff member said, very delicately. “Do you want us to make him taller? Or the same size?”). We finally decided to loop one of my arms through his as he stood casually with one hand in his jeans pocket.

Next, I was led to a green screen studio where I had to hold my pose, arm crooked awkwardly in the air, while they scanned my entire body with a kind of radar and snapped several close-up photos of the details like my face and hair.

As I was scanned, the three-dimensional image materialized on a computer screen at the front of the room. This part actually turned out to be a huge hassle because the print on my dress did not scan well on the first try. I had to change my (meticulously-selected for the occasion!!) outfit to something with bright, solid colors and come back to be scanned a second time.

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Before the big reveal. SCREAMfmLondon

After the scanning, it takes about two weeks for the product to be printed, painted and finished. It was carefully packaged and presented with a weird little Polaroid of Ki-bum and myself outside on the patio that I now have framed on my desk because what else do you do with that?

The finished product is amazing. It’s one of the best things I own. It’s so strange to be able to hold myself in action figure form and inspect it from every angle. It’s surreal, and I love it. I will treasure it for the rest of my life. It will be passed down for generations, until the kids are asking, “Who’s that random cute guy standing with grandma?” It will be my legacy.

Check out my guide to SMTown’s SUM Celebrity Shop and LIVErary Café here.
Check out my guide to SMTown’s Studio and professional k-pop dance class here.

PEACEMINUSONE at Seoul Museum of Art

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G-Dragon’s PEACEMINUSONE exhibition at the Seoul Museum of Art. Tracy Emin’s neon work appears in the “(NON)Fiction Museum.” SCREAMfmLondon

G-Dragon is a masterful multimedia artist. Not only does he produce some of this generation’s most interesting and cutting-edge pop music as a member of Big Bang and as a solo artist, but he’s also delved into other styles of art. He’s an influential, worldwide fashion icon (he recently collaborated with designer Giuseppe Zanotti to launch a fantastic collection of glitter-covered footwear), and this summer he presented a collaborative, mixed-media exhibition called PEACEMINUSONE at the Seoul Museum of Art.

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Gwon O-sang’s painted sculpture “Untitled G-Dragon, A Space of No Name,” based on Raphael’s “St. Michael Vanquishing Satan,” shows G-Dragon as both St. Michael and Satan. SCREAMfmLondon

The exhibition included G-Dragon’s work alongside pieces from 14 other contemporary artists and teams including Park Hyung-geun and Bang & Lee, whose works ranged from photo illustrations to sculpture installations.

PEACEMINUSONE: Beyond the Stage included a “(NON)Fiction Museum” featuring clothing and accessories G-Dragon designed and wore during memorable performances, furniture from his own collection and other items of inspiration.

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Mannequins from Big Bang’s “Bae Bae” are featured at G-Dragon’s PEACEMINUSONE exhibition. SCREAMfmLondon

Although evidence of G-Dragon’s pop culture influence was certainly present, it did not overshadow the other artists’ works or GD’s overall vision, which was kind of cerebral. He explained “PEACEMINUSONE” as his vision of the world — the meeting point between peaceful utopia and imperfect reality.

August 23: Architecture, art and more

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View of Mapo-gu from the 34th floor, overlooking the Han River. SCREAMfmLondon

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Infinite kicked off their Infinite Effect world tour with a concert at Olympic Gymnastics Arena in Seoul on Aug. 8. SCREAMfmLondon

  • Before the Infinite concert on Aug. 8, we were caught in a torrential downpour and had to take shelter in the subway station, where concertgoers had set up little makeshift refugee camps to dry out. We were ridiculously drenched, and my Sungkyu stickers got all warped. But everything was wonderful once our seven boyfriends took the stage. They go above and beyond to create a fantastic experience for the audience: flying signed paper airplanes into the crowd, riding cloud-shaped carts around the arena to hand out actual roses to fans, performing unbelievably in-sync choreography (including the famous scorpion dance move during “Before the Dawn”), and Woohyun’s top coming “”accidentally”” unbuttoned. Also, we did the wave! It was the perfect concert.
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Such picturesque architecture in Samcheong-dong. SCREAMfmLondon

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A collection of Amedeo Modigliani’s portraits are on display at Seoul Arts Center from June 26 – Oct. 4. SCREAMfmLondon

  • The Modigliani exhibition is housed on the uppermost floor of the Hangaram Art Museum within the Seoul Arts Center in Seocho-dong. It is organized into seven themes: Paul Alexandre (Modigliani’s first patron), Portraits of Men, Caryatids (based on the female-shaped columns often present in ancient architecture), Jeanne Hébuterne (Modigliani’s lover, a fellow artist), Portraits of Women, Nudes and Moïse Kisling (a friend of Modigliani’s and another fellow artist). The exhibit is well laid-out and emphasizes Modigliani’s portraits as a means of self-reflection. The subjects of his paintings are usually characterized by their long necks and dark, vacant eyes colored in with no pupils. Modigliani is quoted as saying “When I know your soul, I will paint your eyes”  — a quote that is displayed prominently in the gallery alongside his work.

LED rose garden at Dongdaemun Design Plaza

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Look at them all! LED rose garden in Dongdaemun. SCREAMfmLondon

Dongdaemun is one of Seoul’s most popular neighborhoods for shopping and tourism. A central point in the district is the Dongdaemun Design Plaza — an architectural hotspot built to house conventions and exhibitions.

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Dongdaemun Design Plaza. SCREAMfmLondon

A walk around the DDP at any time of the year will show you some interesting art: from pop-up installations to rooftop gardens, historic artifacts to the neofuturistic building itself (neofuturistic architecture is real big in Seoul). This March, Seoul Fashion Week was held at the DDP.

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A raised platform invites guests to climb up into this metallic piece at the Dongdaemun Design Plaza. SCREAMfmLondon

A garden of more than 21,000 LED long-stemmed, white roses planted into the DDP’s rooftop garden has been a most popular art installation in the area lately. The rose garden will be on display from April 18, 2015 through Feb. 29, 2016.

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The sight is super breath-taking and goes on forever. You will almost definitely have to nudge some selfie-taking couple out of the way to get a good look, but, you know, that’s 2015 for you.

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A sculpture from Sejong University on display at the Dongdaemun Design Plaza. This piece contrasts stress and comfort: the metal chairs representing the stress of work and school are painted white and shaped into clouds, which represent the ultimate comfort. SCREAMfmLondon