Monthly Archives: July 2018

Tea cocktails at Basilur in Sinsa-dong

Tea cocktails at Basilur in Sinsa-dong. SCREAMfmLondon

Sinsa-dong is one of Gangnam’s most popular neighborhoods for shopping and dining. Its most famous shopping street, Garosu-gil, is lined with chic boutiques and trendy cafés. In a city full of Instagram-worthy cafés, you can find a number of them right here in Sinsa.

One café you won’t be able to miss is Basilur Tea & Coffee. The shop takes up two spacious floors of a larger building on one of Sinsa’s side streets, and huge tin cans of branded teas are visible through the floor-to-ceiling picture windows.

Tea cocktail at Basilur in Sinsa-dong. SCREAMfmLondon

Basilur offers a wide variety of hot and iced teas, but I’ve always been drawn to the specialty “tea cocktail” menu for obvious reasons.

Tea cocktail at Basilur in Sinsa-dong. SCREAMfmLondon

To be honest, I was pretty disappointed to learn that these drinks don’t actually contain any alcohol. Why call it a tea cocktail, then, and tease me like that? I was ready to turn up at the tea house.

Tea cocktail at Basilur in Sinsa-dong. SCREAMfmLondon

The tea cocktails come in many different color and flavor combinations, although they all kind of taste the same. Each runs around 6,800 KRW. They’re slightly bubbly, super sweet lemonades, more or less. We now know there’s no alcohol, and if there’s any tea, I definitely couldn’t taste it.

The coolest thing about the drinks are the boba-adjacent little tea bubbles inside. The balls are filled with even more sweet syrup, and they burst in your mouth, making the whole experience a bit more fun.

Tea cocktail at Basilur in Sinsa-dong. SCREAMfmLondon

I do actually quite like Basilur. It has great atmosphere for hanging out and chatting, and the drinks are sweet and tasty. Most of all, it’s aesthetically-pleasing. What more could you ask?

 

 

 

 

Basilur Tea & Coffee
Nonhyeon-ro 159-gil, Gangnam-gu
Hours: 11 a.m. – 11 p.m. Monday – Thursday and Sunday, 11 a.m. – midnight Friday, 11 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Sunday

 

Advertisements

Learning how to surf in Yangyang, South Korea

Our surfing instructor gives Hailey, me and Shayna some pointers on Yangyang’s Jukdo Beach (양양 죽도해변) in South Korea. SCREAMfmLondon

Find out more about Yangyang, South Korea’s coolest surfer town, in this post.

An express bus from Seoul zipped along the winding roads as city skyscrapers gave way to lush greenery and tall mountains. Yangyang, an idyllic surf town in South Korea’s Gangwon Province, is about a two-hour journey from the country’s capital. It doesn’t take long to reach the northeastern coast from Seoul, although it feels like a different world there.

We arrived late Tuesday night in order to wake up for our surf lesson, courtesy of Candy Surf, at 10 a.m. the following day.

Candy Surf offers surf lessons and accommodations in Yangyang. SCREAMfmLondon

Candy Surf is one of the many, many surf shops in Yangyang that offer everything from surf lessons and rentals to repairs and lodgings. The shop is rustically-decorated with hardwood paneling and glass bottles of sand from the world’s beaches adorning its front desk.

Candy Surf bringing SoCal vibes to Gangwon-do. SCREAMfmLondon

Some more beachy decor. SCREAMfmLondon

We stayed overnight in the guesthouse portion of the shop. It’s set up like a typical hostel, with rows of bunk beds lining each wall of the (separate) men’s and women’s rooms.

The room comes complete with a nice floor-to-ceiling window overlooking the beach, which is perfect for ogling the surfers walking around in their wetsuits outside.

The women’s bedroom at Candy Surf’s guesthouse. SCREAMfmLondon

The rooms are clean and well-maintained. Our only major complaint about the guesthouse is that there is no indoor shower — only one outside in the alley. Which is fantastic when you’re coming back from surfing, but sucks when you’ve just finished a long bus ride.

Candy Surf’s outdoor shower room. SCREAMfmLondon

Very outdoors. SCREAMfmLondon

But, anyway, we didn’t come here to shower! We came to surf!

I have always, always dreamed of being a surfer and living in a chill beach house in Santa Cruz with all my surfer friends. But I somehow never got around to trying it in California.

I know Korea doesn’t immediately come to mind as a surf destination, but some of the Korean beaches are really hidden gems. As we woke up for our surfing lesson, the whole town of Yangyang was buzzing with talk about the great waves that were expected that day.

Candy Surf in Yangyang. SCREAMfmLondon

First, we got suited up. Changing into a wetsuit is a whole process in itself. It’s like putting on full-body yoga pants. Once I got my legs in properly, I stood up to take a break, already sweating and breathing heavily. I kind of don’t understand how actual surfers do this quickly without getting it twisted around themselves a dozen times.

A supply of wetsuits at Candy Surf. SCREAMfmLondon

When we were sufficiently clothed, we went inside to view a slideshow presentation on some of the basics of surfing: don’t step on jellyfish, don’t “drop in” on somebody’s wave, don’t get caught in a riptide, etc.

And then we trekked down to the beach, during which process I realized that surfboards are really heavy?! I’ve always seen people carry them on their heads like it ain’t nothin’, but doing that hurt my head. But the boards are too big and unwieldy to carry in your arms without smacking people around you. Again, this ability must come down to surfer magic.

Let’s go! SCREAMfmLondon

Jukdo Beach in Yangyang is packed with surf instructors and their classes. We found our own spot to settle on the sand and practice some techniques, such as paddling and quickly standing up on the boards, before we got into the water.

Learning some technique with Shayna. SCREAMfmLondon

It wasn’t long before we were ready to hop into the ocean.

From the beach, I felt pretty scared. The waves looked huge, and the water looked frigid. As soon as I stepped close enough, a wave smashed me in the face and dunked me under. I gasped and consequently took a big drink of salty ocean water. Sputtering, I resurfaced and wiped the water out of my eyes, thinking, Oh, well. With that out of the way, the ocean didn’t seem so intimidating anymore.

Heading off on our big adventure. SCREAMfmLondon

Our instructor was a big help guiding and helping us all try to catch the waves. It was super fun, although actually getting up into a standing position on the board was pretty challenging. It was also difficult to get the timing down — when to start paddling, when to try standing, etc. — without our instructor yelling behind us.

I think with some more continuous practice, though, I could totally be an excellent surfer.

After a while, the instructor left to teach his next lesson, and we were free to play with the boards on our own. Despite feeling so apprehensive that morning, convinced I was going to embarrass myself and drown, I was really loving surfing, and I never wanted to get out of the water.

South Korea may not be known for its surfing, but my first surf lesson in Yangyang was an unforgettable, once-in-a-lifetime experience. I’m so glad I did it.

Immortalized on the polaroid wall at Candy Surf in Yangyang. SCREAMfmLondon

Trying Henry Lau’s Taiwanese restaurant in Apgujeong

The spread at Xiao Zhan (샤오짠) — Henry Lau’s Taiwanese restaurant in Apgujeong. SCREAMfmLondon

Henry Lau is a busy man. The singer/musician/actor/songwriter who speaks five languages also recently opened his first restaurant in Seoul. And here I am, barely managing to post one blog entry every six months…

Xiao Zhan, located on a cozy Apgujeong side street. SCREAMfmLondon

Henry is primarily known for his music as a member of Super Junior-M, the Chinese sub-unit of Korean boyband Super Junior. He’s also previously shown his passion for food by appearing on the competition show Master Chef Korea – Celebrity and in the film Final Recipe, in which he portrayed a struggling chef.

However, this April, he completed his ten-year contract with SM Entertainment and officially left the group and the company. Now, he appears to be open to more solo opportunities and business ventures (such as restaurant management?).

I’m definitely not a big fan of Super Junior (sorry… sorry), but I love food, and Henry’s restaurant is conveniently located a few blocks from my apartment in Apgujeong, so I decided to come along with my friend for the grand opening.

Pai gu fan and niu rou mien at Xiao Zhan Taiwanese restaurant in Apgujeong. SCREAMfmLondon

If you don’t know, Henry was raised in Canada but is of Hong Kong and Taiwanese descent. His restaurant, Xiao Zhan, pays tribute to his heritage by serving up Chinese and Taiwanese dishes.

The restaurant is cozy and warmly-decorated, and its offerings are affordably-priced. Although it’s located in the heart of Apgujeong’s shopping district, it can be found on a less-trafficked side street rather than a main thoroughfare.

We ordered pai gu fan (8,000 KRW) and niu rou mien (9,000 KRW), along with some Taiwanese beer.

Niu rou mien: beef noodley goodness at Xiao Zhan. SCREAMfmLondon

The niu rou mien is a tasty beef noodle soup. The broth is comforting and flavorful with a little kick of spicy peppercorn. The beef is soft and tender, melting in your mouth as you enjoy the large serving.

The pai gu fan is like fried pork chop over rice. The pork pieces were crispy, although rather dry. The delicious bok choy was probably my favorite part of this dish. Overall, the rice-to-toppings ratio was too far off. I had no interest in eating all that white rice when there were far more tasty things on the menu.

Next time, I’d like to try the Taiwan-style popcorn chicken (7,000) that I saw on so many other tables. It smelled amazing, and I was jealous that we didn’t order any of our own.

Pai gu fan: fried pork chop and like 20 pounds of white rice. SCREAMfmLondon

Xiao Zhan, with its close proximity to other tourist hotspots, would be a fun place for k-pop fans to visit in Seoul. The price point is certainly reasonable, and the delectable beef noodles offer a great taste of Taiwan.


 

 

 

Xiao Zhan (샤오짠)
657-22 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu
Hours: daily from 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. for lunch, 4:30 – 9 p.m. for dinner